« January 2010 | Main | March 2010 »

4 posts from February 2010

February 24, 2010

Enterprise Search Summit 2010 - DC

Even as we prepare for ESS East in New York (ESS NY from now on?), Information Today has issued its call for papers for the first ever ESS-DC to be held in Washington DC November 16-18 2010.

Follow this link to find background on what InfoToday is looking for; or jump right to the submissions page. Don't be shy: everyone who presents papers had, at one time, never done it before. What you know, someone else needs to know!

In our experience, the kind of content InfoToday likes is the information that can help an organization select or manage search and related technologies. Generally, real-world stories about how other companies and organizations have succeeded with search are the ones that attendees appreciate the most. 

We'll also be having a searchdev dinner at ESS DC this year. Details to come late in summer, but plan for it now!

Are you doing search now? Have you been successful getting it going on time and under budget? Tell your story. Submit your idea now!

February 10, 2010

Acquitision Wednesday

As we hinted here last week, Autonomy has announced that it has acquired MicroLink, its 2007 Partner of the Year.

MicroLink, a major player for Autonomy and for Microsoft in the federal; space, has been a reseller and implementation partner for both for years. As recently as last year, MicroLink started development of a very cool social search product that helped blur the lines between enterprise search and social search on the SharePoint platform, and had architected its application to sit on FAST as well as IDOL. There were even hints that they were eying a Lucene platform. 

I would have loved to be able to hear the negotiations between Microsoft and Autonomy concerning access to internals of the FAST search engine currently being integrated tightly into SharePoint. The story we've heard is that the Microsoft negotiations contributed to the delay in the announcement, since apparently folks in both companies have had the news since at least Christmas.

It will be curious to see what happens now. We've always thought of MicroLink as a consulting firm, delivering implementation support. Mike Lynch, Autonomy's boss, has never had good things to say about consultants, and has certainly overseen the dwindling of the Verity consulting group he acquired a few years back. Either he's decided that independent consultants are bad, his consultants are good; or he's hoping he can reduce his 'days outstanding' receivables by bring the implementers in house. Let's hope it wasn't $55M spent just to gain access to the federal sales force.

/s/Miles

News front: Convera files for dissolution

Convera, one of the companies offering 'vertical search' to help publishers and other content owners monetize their content, has filed to dissolve and liquidate the business. It was de-listed from NASDAQ Monday afternoon.

Convera, not unlike SearchButton.com which NIE spun off in 1998, was a hosted search company - now called 'site search' or 'search as a service'. It was a great idea, but when things imploded in 2001, Convera went after the market of monetizing content. That lead to Convera becoming a victim of the same problems faced by newspapers and publishers around the world, who they counted as their market: how do you sell content that is freely available from companies like Google, Yahoo, and Bing; and from blogs world-wide?

Google has a pretty darned reasonable site search service, by the way.

RIP.

/s/Miles

News front: Convera files for dissolution

Convera, one of the companies offering 'vertical search' to help publishers and other content owners monetize their content, has filed to dissolve and liquidate the business. It was de-listed from NASDAQ Monday afternoon.

Convera, not unlike SearchButton.com which NIE spun off in 1998, was a hosted search company - now called 'site search' or 'search as a service'. It was a great idea, but when things imploded in 2001, Convera went after the market of monetizing content. That lead to Convera becoming a victim of the same problems faced by newspapers and publishers around the world, who they counted as their market: how do you sell content that is freely available from companies like Google, Yahoo, and Bing; and from blogs world-wide?

Google has a pretty darned reasonable site search service, by the way.

RIP.

/s/Miles